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Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Question

How much foot traffic per hr makes it a high (heavy) traffic area compared to foot traffic per hr for low (light) traffic?


Answer

I went to the Antron® website (http://antron.net) and found their definition of traffic levels. It looks as good as any, and since a carpet company measures this sort of thing due to the nature of their product, you can rely on it to be somewhat representative of at least the carpet side of the industry.
Foot traffic units:
One foot traffic unit is described as a pedestrian walking across a measured section of carpet, one time.
Foot traffic is classified as follows:
Light: less than 100/day. Could also include some directional traffic, but no tracked-in dirt.
Moderate: 100 - 1,000/day. Could also include some directional and nondirectional traffic, some pivoting and little tracked-in dirt.
Heavy: 1,000 - 10,000/day or up to 2,000,000 traffics for the life of the carpet. Could also include some directional, nondirectional and rolling traffic, as well as tracked-in dirt.
Extra Heavy: more than 10,000/day or more than 2,000,000 traffics for the life of the carpet. Could also include some directional, nondirectional, pivoting and rolling traffic, as well as tracked-in dirt.
Note the inclusion of tracked-in soils as an indicator of volume of traffic, hence, wear on the carpet. I’m seeing most of our banks, offices, and retail as moderate to heavy (some floors or areas as light) with airports, schools, hospitals, and big-boy retail as heavy to extra heavy.
For an 8 hour work-day, do the math. 100/8 = 12.5 walkers per hour. I’d stay with the day total though, because there can be highs and lows during the day, each providing a misleading number if taken out of context. 250 passages (moderate) during the lunch hour may not translate to 2000 (heavy) for the entire day.
Lynn E. Krafft, ICAN/ATEX Associate Editor
lekrafft@juno.com